Know Your Hazards Mapping Application - Terms of Use


The County of San Diego, the County of San Diego Office of Emergency Services, the Unified San Diego County Emergency Services Organization, the Unified Disaster Council and each organization’s officers, employees, and agents, assume no legal liability for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, product, or process disclosed herein, or for any injuries or damages arising from any use or application of the information, products or processes described or disclosed herein. The information in this mapping application is provided without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to, the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose. This hazard profile is not a legal document and does not meet disclosure requirements for real estate transactions or for any other regulatory purpose. Many agencies frequently update their mapping data and this tool may not have the most recent data available. Other hazard zone determinations may be locally mandated; check with your local jurisdiction for additional information. Address matching is done through the process of geocoding which by its nature does not provide an exact location match.

Note: It is important to understand that being in a hazard zone does not always imply risk; mitigation activities may have been completed that reduce risk (for instance elevation of a home in a flood zone). Not being within a hazard zone does not guarantee safety (unmapped or undiscovered faults are an example). In addition, not all areas of the county have been mapped for all hazards so the hazard level may not be known in some cases. It is advisable to be prepared for emergencies regardless of your location.

Data Constraints

Wildfire

Fire Hazard Severity Zone maps evaluate "hazard," not "risk." They are like flood zone maps. "Hazard" is based on the physical conditions that create a likelihood that an area will burn over a 30 to 50-year period, without considering modifications such as fuel reduction efforts, which are temporary and cannot be expected to persist over time. "Risk" is the potential damage a fire can do to the area under existing conditions, including any modifications such as defensible space, irrigation and sprinklers, and ignition resistant building construction.

It is important to understand that being in a hazard zone does not always mean high risk; mitigation activities may have been completed that reduce risk (for instance, elevation of a home in a flood zone). Not being within a regulatory hazard zone does not guarantee safety (unmapped or undiscovered faults are an example). In addition, not all areas of the state have been mapped for all hazards, so the hazard level may not be known in some cases. It is advisable to be prepared for emergencies regardless of your location.

To obtain Fire and Resource Assessment Program (FRAP) maps, data, metadata and publications visit http://frap.fire.ca.gov/.

For more information, contact CAL FIRE-FRAP, PO Box 944246, Sacramento, CA 94244-2460, (916) 327-3939.

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Earthquake

This data shows the relative intensity of ground shaking in California from anticipated future earthquakes. The shaking potential is calculated as the level of ground motion that has a 2% chance of being exceeded in 50 years, which is the same as the level of ground-shaking with about a 2500-year average repeat time. Relatively long-period (1.0 second) earthquake shaking is shown here. Long-period shaking affects tall, relatively flexible buildings, but also correlates well with overall earthquake damage. Although the greatest hazard is in areas of highest intensity as shown on the map, no region is immune from potential earthquake damage.

Earthquake shaking potential is calculated considering historic earthquakes, slip rates on major faults and deformation throughout the region and the potential for amplification of seismic waves by near-surface geologic materials. The complete analysis is called a Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis. The resulting earthquake shaking potential is used in developing building code design values, estimating future earthquake losses and prioritizing earthquake retrofit.

For more information on earthquake shaking, visit http://www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/rghm/psha.

Faults data show fault-based seismic sources used in the time-independent component of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, Version 3 (UCERF3), which provides authoritative estimates of the magnitude, location, and time-averaged frequency of potentially damaging earthquakes in California. This data depicts the surface traces of modeled faults, which are simplified from the California Geological Survey – United States Geological Survey (CGS – USGS) Quaternary Fault and Fold database. For additional information regarding modeled faults in UCERF3 please refer to Appendix A of the UCERF3 report (https://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2013/1165/). For additional information about UCERF3 please see http://www.conservation.ca.gov/cgs/rghm/psha/Pages/sr_228.aspx for the full UCERF3 publication and supporting products.

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Flooding

This web map represents Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM) data important for floodplain management, mitigation, and insurance activities for the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP). The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) data present the flood risk information depicted on the FIRM in a digital format suitable for use in electronic mapping applications. The NFHL database is a subset of the information created for the Flood Insurance Studies (FIS) and serves as a means to archive a portion of the information collected during the FIS. The NFHL data incorporates Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) databases published by Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). The 100-year flood is referred to as the 1% annual exceedance probability flood, since it is a flood that has a 1% chance of being equaled or exceeded in any single year.

The primary risk classifications used are the 1-percent-annual-chance flood event, the 0.2-percent-annual-chance flood event, and areas of minimal flood risk. The 1% annual chance (base flood) is the flood that has a 1% chance of being equaled or exceeded in any year. The Special Flood Hazard Area (SFHA) is the area subject to flooding by the 1% annual chance flood. Areas of Special Flood Hazard include Zones A, AE, AH, AO, AR, A99, D, V, VE, and X.

The NFHL data are derived from Flood Insurance Studies (FISs), previously published Flood Insurance Rate Maps, flood hazard analyses performed in support of the FISs and FIRMs, and new mapping data where available. The NFHL data is available at State level.

The data displayed only shows San Diego County and has a Latest Study Effective Date of 5/16/12 and a Latest Letter of Map Revision Effective Date of 4/08/2016.

For more information, visit https://msc.fema.gov/portal.

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Tsunami

This tsunami inundation map was prepared to assist cities and counties in identifying their tsunami hazard. It is intended for local jurisdictional, coastal evacuation planning uses only. This map, and the information presented herein, is not a legal document and does not meet disclosure requirements for real estate transactions nor for any other regulatory purpose.

The inundation map has been compiled with best currently available scientific information. The inundation line represents the maximum considered tsunami runup from a number of extreme, yet realistic, tsunami sources. Tsunamis are rare events; due to a lack of known occurrences in the historical record, this map includes no information about the probability of any tsunami affecting any area within a specific period of time.

Please refer to the following websites for additional information on the construction and/or intended use of the tsunami inundation map:

State of California Emergency Management Agency, Earthquake and Tsunami Program:
http://www.caloes.ca.gov/cal-oes-divisions/earthquake-tsunami-volcano-programs

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency Center for Tsunami Research (MOST model):
http://nctr.pmel.noaa.gov/time/background/models.html

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